Pruning Climbing Roses

 

    Star-Tip 1070

Gardening Tips for successful and beautiful Landscapes and Gardens

 

 

These simplified drawings are to illustrate general principles only; You'll have to figure out which branch is which when you get doing this in your own garden. Luckily roses are amazingly forgiving plants and should you make a mistake, they'll grow out of it in time.

 

The first year, simply allow the rose to throw shoots. Feed it and love it as per the directions on this website. It will likely produce a bunch of canes and may or may not flower depending on the variety.

In year two as the illustration to the left indicates, remove all but 3 to 5 of the strongest canes. In this example, there are 3 canes for ease of drawing.

 

In the spring of year 2, your canes should be 4-6 feet tall and you’re encouraged to cut off the last two feet or so to bring the canes down to 3-4 feet tall. This will encourage the development of flowering side shoots.

You can see the slightly highlighted portion of the side shoots (only 2 on each cane to keep things simple).

 

In real life, there will be a lot more flowering canes being thrown.

In year 3, you’re once again going to cut back those long flowering shoots. They should have easily reached 8 feet tall.

 

 

Feel free to cut them back by one-third to one-half their original height.

In year 3, you’re once again going to cut back those long flowering shoots. They should have easily reached 8 feet tall.

 

Feel free to cut them back by one-third to one-half their original height.

 

If you happen to have a nice trellis to help train your vining rose, then this graphic might help give your plan some extra vision.

 

You’ll notice the long, more vertical shoots have been selected for pruning. Keep the major verticals down to 6 or so, and promote new horizontals (horizontals produce the flowers!)

 

 

In subsequent years, cut out all dead wood in the spring. Cut out roughly one third of all previous years cane growth allowing new canes to grow into their space. This  is then repeated each year.

 

Pruning climbing roses only gets difficult when you try to get your hands into the middle of some thorny rose and it fights back. Wear your gloves and eye protection!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

© 2007, Star Nursery, Inc.                                                    Copy Provided courtesy of Star Nursery www.StarNursery.com